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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    they used the small gaff to get their catches out Dimensions L 47 in W 3 in H 1 in Credits E W Nelson 1879 Anuurarmiut Department of Anthropology Smithsonian Institution 36022 Nuqaq Spear Thrower Description Dimensions Credits Description Spear thrower used by both men and women Annie Blue said This device made the spear go farther and it will make the throw more powerful Dimensions L 18 1 2 in W 3 1 4 in D 1 2 in Credits C L Hall 1904 Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University 63547 Photo Ann Fienup Riordan Paul John demonstrates the use of a spear thrower Frank Andrew recalled At high tide they let us practice throwing seal hunting spears using a spear thrower We aimed at little things pretending that the foam was a floating seal Aklegaq Barbed Harpoon Description Dimensions Credits Description Barbed harpoon with seal bladder float Peter John called the barbed point the harpoon s hand that held onto the animal that was pierced Dimensions L 50 1 2 in Diameter 1 3 4 in Credits J A Jacobsen 1882 Ethnologisches Museum Berlin IVA5230 Nagiiquyaq Seal Hunting Spear Description Dimensions Credits Description The heavy socket piece made to hold a barbed point weights the front and allows the spear to float upright in water for easy retrieval Dimensions L 54 1 2 in W 1 1 4 in H 1 1 2 in Credits E W Nelson 1879 lower Kuskokwim River Department of Anthropology Smithsonian Institution 36081 Asaaquq Toggling Harpoon Description Dimensions Credits Description Dennis Sheldon noted The harpoon point gets left behind in the animal and turns sideways When the hole where the point entered is small and when it suddenly turns sideways it cannot come off Dimensions L 60 3 4 in W

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/3coastspring/3-1a.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    all the time and I never saw store bought socks We wore only twined grass socks Gift of Mrs Hazel M Anderson Anchorage Museum 1971 137 009 Kangciraq Grass Mat Grass mat Martina John recalled Grass mats had their own designs and the wall mats had different designs They made small x s on the edges but the designs got lost before I learned how to twine W J Fisher 1884 Bristol Bay Department of Anthropology Smithsonian Institution 90463 Arilluuk Fish Skin Mittens Fish skin mittens with grass liners used for kayak travel during spring in bad weather A H Twitchell 1919 Kuskokwim Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonian Institution 9 3523 9 3519 Qaspeq Grass Shirt Grass shirt used to keep a person warm and dry Elena Charles remarked This is a grass qaspeq hooded garment The neck opening has a thin strip of wolverine A woman who was an expert twiner made it just like a parka A H Twitchell 1919 Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonian Institution 9 3522 Science panel Shedding Water All plant leaves have a waxy covering on their surface known as cuticle which slows the loss of moisture from

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/7gathering/7-2a.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    L 49 in W 8 1 2 in H 4 1 4 in Credits Nunivak Anchorage Museum 1982 034 001AB Qerruinaq Sealskin Float Description Dimensions Credits Description Frank Andrew said We never went without floats in open water on the ocean We kept them inflated in case we happened to capsize while we were alone in a place with no ice Dimensions L 36 in Diameter 18 in Credits Prepared by Martina John of Toksook Bay 2007 Anchorage Museum Negcik Gaff Description Dimensions Credits Description Gaffs supported grass mats as a windbreak while the hunters rested on the ice Dimensions L 72 in W 9 in H 2 in Credits Gaff made by Noah Andrew Sr 2007 Anchorage Museum Imarnitek Seal gut Parka Description Dimensions Credits Description Seal gut parka made by Neva Rivers from the intestines of a single bearded seal with a wide hem made to fit snugly over the kayak s cockpit coaming Neva Rivers said It was their shield Wind will not enter whatsoever and the heat will stay inside It is a useful item after it was a useless intestine How smart Theresa Moses recalled When we wore seal gut parkas when we got thirsty we d look for lakes with fresh water and put some in the lower part of the garment to carry back so that others could drink and the water wouldn t leak out Dimensions L 45 3 4 in W 6 1 4 in H 42 1 2 in Credits Anchorage Museum 2005 024 001 Ivrucik Waterproof Skin Boots Description Dimensions Credits Description Men who were able to go seal hunting never went without them recalled Phillip Moses Dimensions W 10 3 4 in H 43 1 4 in Diameter 26 in Credits Rosalie Paniyak Chevak 1978 Anchorage Museum 1978

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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    five cents or a yard of cloth Now these same baskets sell for hundreds even thousands of dollars T Riggs 1907 Alaska State Museum IIA2370 Uskuraq Grass Dog Harness Grass dog harness John Phillip recalled In our village they hung tomcod to dry by braiding grass and threading the strands around the fishes necks Once they were dried we would remove all the fish heads leaving the braided grass After freeze up in fall when we boys wanted to drive dogs we connected the braids and made them into harnesses Made by Paul John of T oksook Bay 2007 AFR AFR Theresa Moses Peter John and Frank Andrew examine a grass dog harness spread out during a visit to the Smithsonian Museum Support Center 2003 Taluyaruaq Grass Fish Trap Grass fish trap made by Neva Rivers out of coarse seashore grass in 1977 to set in nearby streams and catch needlefish Neva Rivers recalled Those who lived long ago used grass and they didn t even mind using it They weren t proud and they even lived longer Anchorage Municipal Acquisition Fund Anchorage Museum 1977 017 001 Tegumiak Wall Taruyamaarutek Dance fans Dance fans made of coiled grass and caribou

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/7gathering/7-2b.html (2016-05-01)
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