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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    hunting food to fill the other corner of the mouth Wassilie Evan Akiak The Yukon Kuskokwim delta is rich in resources for those who knew how to use them Beginning in spring men and women were constantly working to harvest what the land and sea provided Driftwood slate ivory bone fish skin seal gut these were just some of the materials Yup ik people learned to use and value Augkut wa allrakum iluani ayagniryaraat ciuqliuluku imarpiliuryararput unani cenarmiuni makut yuungnaqlemteni waten tungliqu urluteng taiguralriit caliaput iralutgun llu kiagmi yaavet uksurvianun waten tungliqutaciicetun piurquvceteng assirciqelriit Nauwa nallunrilkeci tua i pingnaq lalriani pingnaqkengaput pellugaqata makut allat alaitulriit nugtarrluta ll tuavet tua i Tamakut tua i aturluki piyunarqeciqut During the time they start to hunt again in spring first comes ocean hunting by those of us from the coast Those of us who subsist know that when one activity is over others start and we move on It would be good if you presented these in order through the seasons Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Our story begins with preparation in the village and moves through spring summer fall and early winter harvesting activities We then return to the winter village where activities today as

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/1intro/1-5.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    Paul John Toksook Bay The Yukon Kuskokwim delta is rich in resources for those who knew how to use them Beginning in spring men and women were constantly working to harvest what the land and sea provided Driftwood slate ivory bone fish skin seal gut these were just some of the materials Yup ik people learned to use and value Muriim Yua The personhood of wood Photo James H Barker Mona and George Washington gather wood near Stebbins 1982 Theresa Moses recalled They say that when something is available you have to collect it before snow covers it For us girls it was grass and for young boys it was wood Cailkami gguq pektaqamta muragaq inangqalngullra neq akluku kiitengnaqluku waten pek arcitengnaqluku pitukilta Mumigartaqami gguq quyatuuq muragaq Tavaten tua i pillrat piluku tamakut tamaa i niitellrenka aturluki Kia kinquvet alekluten piksugluten piyuaraaten Tavaten qaniqeraqluki Tavaten lingrayutuut gguq quyaluku ll tauna pistelteng qacullerkaanun lucky llerkaanun llu cingqeraqaat When we roam on land remembering that driftwood was tired of lying on one side we were told to always pull it from the ground and let it dry They say when driftwood was turned over it would be grateful So remembering what I

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/1intro/1-6.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    of wood before paper cards were readily available L Bales 1900 1913 Alaska State Museum IIA3352 Suukiik Socks New materials were also used to create traditional items as in these socks made with gunnysack thread using the same technique used to make grass socks Made by Anna Phillip Aniak 1959 UA Museum of the North 2002 001 0101 Taluyaq Wire Fish Trap Taluyaq Wire fish trap like those used throughout southwest Alaska today Though easier to make and more durable than wooden traps elders say that water makes noise against the wire scaring the fish Yupiit Piciryarait Cultural Center and Museum 95 1 52 Qantat Qaltat llu Plastic Bowls and Buckets Plastic bowls and buckets replacing sealskin pokes used to store food in the past Issran Carrying Bag Carrying bag made from plastic shopping bags with yarn decorations AFR 2002 Bethel Qalupauk Fish Dipper Fish dipper made from a tea pot UA Museum of the North 70 053 0093 Elqiaq Hunting Hat made by Kirt Bell of Hooper Bay in 1974 out of linoleum instead of wood as the most convenient bendable material close at hand painted with flour paste and decorated with ivory and eider feathers AFR Jane Schuldberg

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/12today/12-1.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    nata cirlakevkarpek nata Tauna piniqerkauluku man a qanruyun niitellerput piniutekarkauluku wangkuta When we come upon certain situations our instruction comes to mind and we remember it And that teaching we remembered will not let the situation defeat us That instruction we heard will be our source of strength Frank Paul Kipnuk Qaneryaraq gguq wavet cingillemtenun qillrulluku waten aug arrngairutelluku They used to tell us that we should tie our instructions to our ankles with our shoelaces so that they would not become untied Tua i tuaten ayuquq qanruyun Cingillrutekluku gguq tua i loose arngairutelluku wavet katagngairutelluku Cunawa uum iluanun ekluku qamiqumun That is how the qanruyun works in our life They said that we should tie them so that they would not become untied so that we would not lose our instructions They actually meant putting it into our minds Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Yuum gguq quyallra nekayullra llu tukniuq They say a person s feelings of gratitude and humiliation are powerful Yuum gguq quyallra tukniuq cali llu gguq nekayullra tukniluni Piciulliniluni wiinga quyassiyaagaqama iluteqlua llu cacirkaitaqama agayuaqama tua i agayutetuanka tuaten iliini qialua iliini llu qiavkenii Ilumun tua i yuum umyugaa quyallra tuknilliniami nekayullra llu cali tuknilliniluni Cat tua i avani wangkutnun qanrutkumallruuq ikiullra assillra llu They say a person s feelings of gratitude and feelings of humiliation are powerful When someone does something that makes me very grateful sometimes the only thing I can do is pray for his well being And sometimes my feelings were so strong I would weep in prayer There s truly strength in a person s feelings when happy or when wounded emotionally Back in those days everything was taught to us both the good and the bad Theresa Moses Toksook Bay Quyallagallermegteggun gguq cikirteteng elluarrluteng pillerkaatnun cingqaqutuit umyuamegteggun They say they push their

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/12today/12-2a.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    kayak frame together Bethel 2006 Our language had no word for science yet our tools were so well designed that they allowed us to live in a land no one else would inhabit a land we still call home Elsie Mather Bethel November 2003 When I was in school I hated science I couldn t understand it Not only was it in another language English but all the examples were

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/12today/12-2c.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    to listen to rules for living and placed what he learned in his pocket and went home Theresa Moses Toksook Bay Apertuagurluki Tua i qasgimi elitellruunga canek tua i caliyaramek arcaqerlua caliangqerrsaraanek angutem Taumek qasgi takarnarqellruuq marayaungermi They explained everything I learned how to do things in the qasgi especially how to make things and do men s work That s why the qasgi was honorable even though it was made of mud Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Qasgiyaurcama tamatum nalliini aanama pinauraanga Kitak qasgimun agluten teglessaagaa Cunawa waten pilallinikiinga qalarquralria niicugnikumku tugrumanrilngerma tuaken eliskuma tamaaken umyuaqerkamnek unguvallma taktaciatun atuumarkaulliniluku When I was old enough to go to the qasgi my mother would say Okay go over to the qasgi and try to steal something She apparently meant that when I listened to men teaching though the instructor wasn t talking directly to me if I learned something it would be something that would help me over and over for the rest of my life Paul Kiunya Kipnuk Qasgiruaq Qasgi Description Dimensions Credits Qasgi Model Model made by Frank and Noah Andrew in 2005 The gradual shortening of the beams creates a dome with corner posts but no central support The Romans

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/2qasgi/2-1a.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    Qaluuritaicuitellruut Two water buckets belonged to all the men in the qasgi They carefully watched them even in winter They always had a dipper right there to drink with Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Dimensions H 8 3 4 in Diameter 8 in Credits Anchorage Museum Qalun Dipper Description Dimensions Credits Description Dipper with Raven s foot design on its underside Mary Ann Sundown noted The men in our family had Raven s footprint as their emblem from the beginning Dimensions L 16 1 4 in W 4 1 2 in H 3 in Credits Phoebe Apperson Hearst Museum of Anthropology University of California Berkeley 2 5732 Kenngessuutet Fire making Tools Description Dimensions Credits Description Frank Andrew recalled They say that nasal mucus makes it easy to start fires When they used fire starting tools they would smear some of their snot onto the edge of this fireboard They say the fire starts right away Dimensions L 15 1 2 In W 1 in H 1 in Credits Togiak Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University 50030 Paul John Demonstrating Friction Fire making Paul noted You might be repulsed by the idea of holding the mouthpiece with your teeth but in my opinion our Provider has not brought it to us with bad intentions Back when it was used it was regarded as clean and was used by many individuals Photo Ann Fienup Riordan Kenurraq Stone Lamp and Lamp Stand Description Dimensions Credits Description Frank Andrew noted They placed lamps on lamp stands that were concave on top They didn t have lamp stands in homes only in the qasgi Dimensions Stone Lamp L 8 in W 6 3 4 in H 3 1 4 in Lamp Stand H 6 1 2 in Diameter 3 1 4 in Credits S Jackson

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/2qasgi/2-1.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    preparing kayak parts They d begin making clothing and getting ready for the spring hunt And they d begin making replacements for garments and implements that were in poor condition and they got them ready before the hunting season arrived During that time the qasgi would be filled with men working The qasgi would be filled with the scent of driftwood And the floor around the fire pit would be covered with wood shavings Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Late winter and early spring were times of preparation While women worked in their homes sewing new clothing men worked in the qasgi carving and repairing the tools they would use in the months ahead Kepun Adz Description Dimensions Credits Description Adz An essential tool used to chop and plane wood Dimensions L 12 1 2 in W 4 in H 1 in Credits National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonian Institution 6575 Mellgar Crooked Knife Description Dimensions Credits Description Carvers used the blade to smooth and finish rough cut wood and the bone or antler handle tip to split strips of straight grained wood Dimensions L 10 1 4 in H 2 in D 1 in Credits A Martin 1930s Kwigillingok Gift

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/2qasgi/2-2.html (2016-05-01)
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