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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    pliable stump All the kayak parts could actually be constructed out of one log The stump was made into the ribs and the trunk was cut into long lengths and made into side stringers Murapiit Spruce Driftwood Description Dimensions Credits Description Spruce roots both raw and split Frank Andrew said They split them and used them for twine for kayak bindings and to bind slate blades to the handles of curved knives Spruce roots don t rot easily and last a long time as bindings Dimensions L 18 1 2 in W 5 1 4 in H 11 1 4 in Credits Anchorage Museum Murapiit Spruce Driftwood Description Dimensions Credits Description Straight grained Wood Frank Andrew said These pieces of straight grained wood among all the different kinds of wood are especially useful to make into things Dimensions L 29 1 4 in W 6 3 4 in H 4 in Credits Anchorage Museum Murapiit Spruce Driftwood Description Dimensions Credits Description Mimernaq Tree stump With natural curve and high resin content that deterred cracking was ideal for the thicker parts of boat and kayak frames Dimensions L 31 in W 6 in H 8 in Credits Anchorage Museum Anguarun Single

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/2qasgi/2-3.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    qanruyutet atungnaqluki maliggluki pillermikun ellminek tua i nukalpiamek aprumayugngallerkaminun yuk tekiutellriatun ayuqetulliniluni A person clears his future path by using the shovel hoping to be a successful hunter in the future all winter long he d work on snow and dig out pathways from the entrances of homes Working hard using the shovel trying to follow the teachings can bring a person to the time when he can be called a successful hunter and provider Paul John Toksook Bay Boys received a moral as well as technical education in the qasgi There they were expected to take on all manner of chores to prepare themselves both mentally and physically for adulthood Among their most important tasks were clearing porches and pathways of snow acts said to remove obstacles from their path while hunting in the future Qalun Dipper Description Dimensions Credits Description Water consumption was also carefully regulated in the qasgi and boys only drank using a dipper never their cupped hands These restrictions were said to ensure that their bodies grew tough and strong Dimensions H 4 1 4 in W 9 1 4 in H 5 1 2 in Credits Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/2qasgi/2-4.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    at Hooper Bay in 1946 The final winter ceremony Agayuyaraq way of requesting or praying for abundance involved singing songs of supplication to the animals yuit their persons accompanied by masked dances performed under the shaman s direction Men created ritually powerful masks through which the animals yuit and shamans spirit helpers revealed themselves as simultaneously dangerous and helpful Used in enactments of past spiritual encounters the masks had the power to evoke such encounters in the future Kegginaquq Mask Mask collected from Qissunaq in 1905 by Tununak trader I A Lee Toggle harpoon points are appended to the lower face over which two seal figures arch topped by hunters in kayaks Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University 66314 Kegginaquq Mask Mask collected from Qissunaq The large knobs may represent seal breathing holes as a walrus and a seal emerge from them The grass figure on top wears a European style hat I A Lee Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University 66315 Kegginaquq Mask Kegginaquq Mask said to represent a tuunraq a shaman s helping spirit used in dances to request future abundance symbolized by the carved creatures on the mask s forehead E W Nelson

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/11drumming/11-1.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    hopes that the animals would be plentiful in the summer Justina Mike St Marys Elders tell us that each dance song consists of both a chorus and two or three apallut verses which the masked dancers enacted Masks appeared in pairs and trios because the songs they dramatized had two and three verses No single meaning underlies the paired masks Some highlight opposites ocean and land day and night male

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/11drumming/11-1a.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    many years Upluni kiagmek ayagluni tamaa i aruqutkaminek yurautekaminek He begins getting ready starting in summer gathering food and material to give away at the festival Phillip Moses Toksook Bay Maa i man kevgiryaraq upyutaqamegteggu calirpautekluku pilalliniat Aptellriit tua piyugluteng piaqata tua i uitayungermeng uitasciiganateng tauna tua i piyukengaat unakengnaqluku tua piuratulliniameng When they got ready for the Messenger Feast they worked very hard When someone asked for something though they wanted to just lay back they couldn t sit still and would go out and work hard to acquire what that person wanted Andy Paukan St Marys Kevgiq the Messenger Feast was a dance exchange during which pairs of villages took turns hosting each other It was a rich display and distribution of the bounty of the harvest providing a clear statement of respect to the animals who had given themselves to human hunters In the fall two messengers were sent to invite the guest village Thus began much back and forth visiting during which the hosts communicated their desire for hard to obtain gifts from their guests and vice versa A three day festival in late February or March culminated these exchanges with dancing and an abundance of

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/11drumming/11-2.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    a bearded seal on ice Just as he reached it and was about to harpoon it on this side of it along the edge it was lying on an arm came up with the palm of a hand facing him A hole was in the palm s center The hand was covering the bearded seal but the animal was visible through the hole So without hesitation he thrust his spear right at that hole and hit the animal and caught it The story about that hunter is usually carved on dance sticks Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Tegumiak Wall Taruyamaarutek Dance fans Dance fans with faces said by Jacobsen to represent the king of salmon peer out from feather frames representing holes in the sky Dancers always carried dance fans or covered their hands with gloves as protection from spirits and to prevent their own essence from escaping J A Jacobsen 1882 lower Yukon River Ethnologisches Museum Berlin IVA4372 Photo James H Barker Stephanie Carl and Anna John of Toksook Bay perform during the Toksook Bay Dance Festival January 1996 Eniraraun Messenger s Wand Messenger s Wand for the Inviting In feast St Michael The hoops may represent the different levels of ella the universe Phoebe Apperson Hearst Museum of Anthropology University of California Berkeley 2 6481 Kuigpagmiuni Kassiyulriit Yukon dance festival 1958 Jean and Pete Kline Collection Kuigpagmiuni Kassiyulriit Yukon dance festival drawn by Pilot Station artist Milo Minock who described how as the song ends the central owl was lowered on a cord and its wings moved up and down The man at the far left was dressed as a muskrat and danced in hopes of more muskrats for people to hunt in spring At the end of the dance everything was given out and everyone got something to eat

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/11drumming/11-2a.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    ciumek pistairutellriit aatairutellriit arnamek llu mingqestekairutellriit Tuaten ayuqellruuq yuraryaraq augna atullerput aulukiluni After food was distributed they would distribute the items gathered for the festival to the orphans widows those who had lost their fathers or women who sewed things for them That is how the tradition of dance took care of people Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Ilaminek tuvqayugturquni atam wall u nerevkariurluni allanernek ca qunukevkenaku yugnun ikayuuteku urquniu imutun neqa

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/11drumming/11-2b.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    Dance Head Dress Anchorage Municipal Acquisition Fund Anchorage Museum 1970 090 002 Dance headdress worn by young girls to keep their caarrluk dust and scent from injuring others Frank Andrew said Girls always wore those beaded hats even though they weren t dancing Their hair never flew around because those people were never careless letting their hair get everywhere Nacarrluk Dance headdress Dance headdress for special occasions heavy with valuable trade beads Phoebe Apperson Hearst Museum of Anthropology University of California Berkeley 2 6796 Manumik Chest decoration Chest decoration made of beads box covers and pieces of an oil lamp worn by a woman over her parka and around her neck during dances J A Jacobsen 1882 Ethnologisches Museum Berlin IVA5390 AFR Holding up the Nushagak ornament Catherine Moore commented I m looking at a manumik my goodness These were given to older girls I used to hold one and rub my hands on it wishing I could own one like it Cauyaq Drum Cauyaq Drum with bird head handle used for dancing Frank Andrew explained When they were not using drums they removed the walrus stomach covers and stored the rims in caches Drums were handled with care Phoebe

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/11drumming/11a.html (2016-05-01)
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