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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    his garment Then he d take his kayak and start going down toward the ocean allowing his kayak to glide over the fire They say before going to the ocean the hunter was cleansing himself like that to shine brighter and not be offensive in the eyes of the ocean s inhabitants David Martin Kipnuk Tuamtellu wangkuta unavet imarpigmun atraqarraaraqamta tamana atunricuunaku aviukaqsaraq Qalarulluki cali imarpigmiutaat piyukengamtenek cikiumasqelluta And when we went down to the ocean for the first time we always gave an offering of food and water We also spoke to the ones of the ocean and asked that we be given what we wanted Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Ayuq Labrador tea Labrador tea was burned in a fire so that its smoke could purify a kayak being brought to the ocean for the first time Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonian Institution L2230 Dr Leuman M Waugh 1935 Men hunting in kayaks near Kwigillingok in the 1930s Pissulqa wii iquklipailgan aturnanrillrulriit qayat makunek Lund anek cimingluteng Tua i pissurcuutet qacigliluteng qayairutut kiituan Tua i llu qayatgun pitaqelallmeng ikgellerpaitnek pit elangluteng angyatgun pilangameng Uqurrnanrirluteng Amlleq anagilangluni neplirluteng motor aarit pilaameng qayat taugken nepaunateng Before I stopped hunting we no longer used kayaks and started using Lund aluminum boats Other hunting vessels became easier to obtain and soon people didn t own kayaks anymore And when they started using boats the number of seals hunters caught declined They don t obtain a lot of seal oil anymore Hunters started missing the opportunity to catch because their motors were too noisy but kayaks were quiet Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonian Institution L2315 Dr Leuman M Waugh 1935 Men traveling in a kayak seated back to back Qayaq Kayak Description Dimensions Credits Description Kayak

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/3coastspring/3-1.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    in H 9 1 4 in Credits Loaned by The Field Museum of Natural History Chicago 13852 Ugtarcuun Bentwood Hat Description Dimensions Credits Description Bentwood hat from the Kuskokwim Frank Andrew said They used those for seal hunting He would tie his hat on top of the kayak sled If he saw a seal on the ice he would put on the hat and approach it Dimensions L 10 1 2 in W 11 in H 7 in Credits G B Gordon 1905 University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology NA354 Ugtarcuun Bentwood Hat Description Dimensions Credits Description Bentwood hat with wolf face Paul John said This hat is a submarine You can breathe in front when water crashes over your head Dimensions L 8 1 2 in W 12 in Credits 1952 UA Museum of the North 0554 5450 Elqiaq Hunting Visor Description Dimensions Credits Description Hunting visor decorated with pintail feathers and painted black inside to reduce glare Frank Andrew said Wooden visors were also worn in summer Even elderly women used them to avoid getting irritated eyes Dimensions L 12 3 4 in W 8 1 4 in H 17 in Credits J A Jacobsen 1882

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/3coastspring/3-2.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    the parka Neva Rivers described scraping intestines with clam shells to clean them then placing them inside melted puddles of fresh water on the ice to bleach them white Dimensions L 360 in Diameter 2 in Credits Prepared by Martina John of Toksook Bay 2007 Anchorage Museum Amiq Seal Skin Description Dimensions Credits Description Neva Rivers noted A man making a boat gave us children a bearded seal skin with handles cut on the edges for drying We jumped on that skin before they sewed it so it could soften Dimensions L 74 in W 36 in Diameter 5 1 4 in Credits Prepared by Harry Jenny Agnes and Sylvia Friend of Kwigillingok 2007 Anchorage Museum Cetugyugun Seal Scratcher Description Dimensions Credits Description Seal scratcher made with seal claws that helps the hunter sound seal like Phillip Moses recalled with pleasure A man crawls when hunting for seals on ice and when the seal gets up he scratches this on the ice and the seal would lie back down He would get closer When he reaches it he harpoons it Dimensions L 8 3 4 in W 1 3 4 in Diameter 1 in Credits C L Hall 1904 Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University 63540 Qeciqutaq Walrus bladder Water Container Description Dimensions Credits Description Walrus bladder water container with ivory nozzle To make fresh water ocean hunters broke ice into pieces and held containers like this next to their stomachs while they slept Dimensions L 15 in H 6 in Diameter 7 3 4 in Credits Togiak UA Museum of the North 1 1927 0701 Qungasvik Walrus stomach Bag Description Dimensions Credits Description Walrus stomach bag for storing gear and clothing Dimensions L 14 1 2 in W 8 in H 1 in Credits A H Twitchell

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/3coastspring/3-3.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    wall u cali alla uyuraa piskan amllerqunek ilii uqiqulartuq enem iluani tuani Arnat kiimeng avani pitullruut pitaqerraalriit The first catch of the season in spring if it was a big one was given away When a hunter caught the first bearded seal the family wouldn t keep it but his wife held a seal meat and blubber give away party uqiquq as they called it and gave it all to people in the community And if a mother had several sons not just one if this son caught a seal and if his younger brother caught one or if another younger son caught one a parent will hold give away parties several times in spring Only women participated Martina John Toksook Bay The lively distribution of a man s first bearded seal of the season known as uqiquq seal party is celebrated to this day in many Yup ik communities Families spend hundreds of dollars on gifts to give along with the seal meat and blubber in thanks for what has been given to them Uqisaqsuun Blubber Hook Description Dimensions Credits Description Blubber hook from Nunivak used to carry strips of seal blubber Dimensions L 11 1 2 in W

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/3coastspring/3-4.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    sod were then placed on top creating a warm well insulated home Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonian Institution L2299 Dr Leuman M Waugh 1935 A man stands behind the sod windbreak built to protect the entryway to this house The stovepipe is a modern addition Uksumi pilliniunga ellangarcama piunga paluqtam enekngalkiini enemi uitallinilrianga Perhaps it was in winter when I suddenly became aware I looked around and

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/10wintervillage/10a.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    decorated with a three toed design representing the footprint of the creator bird Raven Men painted bowl interiors with their own inherited family designs Qantat Bowls Bowls were stored upside down on a corner shelf so these three toed Raven s foot designs would have been among the first things one saw when entering the house Frank Andrew said They could not go without making this line design on bowl bottoms and many people used it Anchorage Museum Gift of the Huffmon Family 2002 025 298 Gift of Fred and Sara Machetanz 1985 035 210 and 1985 035 204 Tumnaq Serving Bowl Tumnaq Serving bowl Alex Bird noted This was used when they fed people in the qasgi and had a feast K Fuller Alaska State Museum IIA5678 Yupiit Piciryarait Cultural Center and Museum 80 6 1 Angucetaq Qantaq Man s Bowl Man s bowl made from a single piece of wood with painted caribou design belonging to his family S Jackson 1890s Kuskokwim Sheldon Jackson Museum IIS073 Gift of Alma E Lahnum and Williard W Lahnum Anchorage Museum 1998 025 003 Arnartaq Qantaq Woman s Bowl Woman s bowl made with a detachable bottom and separate upper rim Peter John exclaimed This bowl is so nice and well made It is for a woman and has her design inside Only women s bowls have upper parts like this A skilled person really worked carefully on this E W Nelson 1879 Big Lake Department of Anthropology Smithsonian Institution 38340 Qantacuaraak Two Small Bowls Two small bowls from Nelson Island with underside decorations one a man s smiling face and the other a woman s face with downturned mouth I A Lee 1910 Peabody Essex Museum 13076 13077 Uqurvik Qantaq Seal oil Container Seal oil container from the mouth of the

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/10wintervillage/10-1a.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    seem bright Kumarulluut Dried Moss Lamp Wicks Dried moss lamp wicks were also dipped in seal oil and used as fire starters Theresa Moses remembered using them as flashlights They took a piece dipped in seal oil and if they went out to the food cache at night they used it as a light Ann Fienup Riordan 2007 Nelson Island Ipuun Ladle Ladle G B Gordon 1907 Kuskokwim University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology NA1429 Angassaq Ladle Ladle from the Kuskokwim decorated with a toothy mouthed creature Frank Andrew said Decorations varied on different people s things and each had their own emblem from their ancestors S Jackson 1890s Sheldon Jackson Museum IIS004 Ipuutek Ladles Ipuutek Ladles from the Kuskokwim probably made by the same man and displaying his family design Willie Kamkoff compared these designs to signatures They did not write their names on things but made decorations for identification using their ancestors marks 1890s Sheldon Jackson Museum IIS007 IIS012 Luuskaq Spoon Spoon with a common Kuskokwim design that also appears on bowls and dishes G B Gordon 1907 University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology NA1438 Taavtaaq Cockle Shell Spoon Cockle shell used as a

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/10wintervillage/10-1b.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    connective tissue in skin grows in layers The outer layers which are not as tightly cross linked can be broken down by heat and then scraped away leaving the thicker most flexible layers underneath Kakivik Sewing Bag Sewing bag from the tundra region which held a woman s needles thimble sinew thread small knife and whetstone Phillip Moses recalled Some men also kept them in their pockets If they tore something or their skin boots ripped they could sew it I still sew up to this day E W Nelson 1878 Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University 50047 Mingqusviutaq Needle Case Fish shaped needle case from the lower Yukon River E W Nelson 1878 Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University 50089 Mingqusviutaq Needle Case Seal shaped needle case with removable head from Nunivak Island M Lantis 1940 Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture Seattle 2 1233 Mingqutet Needles Needles made of squirrel bone Theresa Moses noted They stored their needles by poking them in the sewing bags Needles might also be stored in ivory needle cases or the hollow section of a swan wing bone Gift of the Huffmon Family Anchorage Museum 2002 025 239 Akngirnailitaq Shell Thimble Akngirnailitaq Shell thimble Betty Huffmon said that people went to the foot of Beluga Hill on the north shore of Goodnews Bay to collect shells like this to use as thimbles Neva Rivers remarked I don t know how to sew without a thimble Gift of the Huffmon Family Anchorage Museum 2002 022 093 Uluaq Woman s Knife Slate bladed woman s knife from Cape Vancouver Annie Blue said This was made to be an uluaq before metal came When sharpened it could be used to cut open and skin any furred animal I A Lee 1905

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/10wintervillage/10-2.html (2016-05-01)
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