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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    was just one we were told to take good care of it and put it away and not just leave it out anywhere They said that we d eventually have enough to make a parka even though they were different kinds of skins Theresa Moses Toksook Bay Women worked long and hard sewing animal pelts into warm and sturdy parkas hats boots and pants to keep their families warm and dry Men worked equally hard supplying their wives with skins to clothe their families noting that it was shameful to let ones spouse lack material to work on Qaliluuk Parka Man s hoodless caribou skin parka from the Yukon Theresa Moses said Men s clothing especially their hunting clothes never fit snugly We try to make the body large and the sleeve top large and heavy duty thinking about when he will try to quickly put his arm through Phoebe Apperson Hearst Museum of Anthropology University of California Berkeley 2 6384 Qaliq Mink parka Qaliq Mink parka made for Elizabeth Nicolai of Kwethluk Paul John said She would make her daughter in law a parka using her own design like transferring her design When a young woman entered the qasgi wearing such a parka and carrying food to a young man all understood them to be husband and wife J Messick 1959 UA Museum of the North 68 008 0001 Nasqurrun Bear Claw Headdress Bear Claw Head dress from Igushak valued reminder of a successful hunt Wassilie Evan recalled They say that brown bears have ears through the ground When people talk aabout how dangerous they are that bear would say Ah why do they say that we are dangerous as if they aren t dangerous themselves Applegate 1886 Department of Anthropology Smithsonian Institution 127327 Nasqurrun Ermine headdress Ermine headdress

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/8fallhunting/8-3.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    Department of Anthropology Smithsonian Institution 48699 Nuusaarpak Three pronged Bird Spear Anchorage Municipal Acquisition Fund Anchorage Museum 1982 078 003 1982 078 004 Three pronged bird spear and another with prongs midway down the shaft Peter John said The nuusaarpak was used all the time for hunting food It was like a 22 rifle and was always available in the kayak Pugsuaq Sinew Ptarmigan Net Ptarmigan Net from the Kuskokwim

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/6birds/6-1.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    traded some of their dried fish for bird skins to make warm winter clothing Tamacenaq Parka Thick bird skin parkas were ideal winter wear but were also used during cold weather in summer Frank Andrew recalled Water just rolls down their feathers and can t go inside These Arctic loons and red throated loons are like that and cannot get wet Gift of Alma E Lahnum and Williard W Lahnum Anchorage Museum 1998 025 003 Atkuk Loon Skin Parka Paul John recalled When I was small they made loon parkas for me But when I was a little bigger they made me parkas of eiders and long tailed ducks because they are warmer When I started hunting in the wilderness I had emperor goose parkas Yupiit Piciryarait Cultural Center and Museum 80 6 1 Alliqsiik Loon skin socks Alliqsiik Loon skin socks Yupiit Piciryarait Cultural Center and Museum 95 1 154 Maqissuun Fire Bath Hat Maqissuun Fire bath hat made from a snowy owl Frank Andrew commented They had head coverings made of bird skins for fire baths with feathers on the outside and light colored belly skin for the edges Yupiit Piciryarait Cultural Center and Museum 95 1 157 Taruyamaarutek wall tegumiak Dance fans Dance fans made by Anna Kungurkak of Toksook Bay in 1970 from snowy owl feathers inserted into plastic coffee can lids Anchorage Municipal Acquisition Fund Anchorage Museum 1970 073 001 Kellarvik Swan Foot Skin Bags Swan foot skin bags Henry Alikayak enthused The makers were very skillful making something out of nothing H Stamp 1918 Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonian Institution 15 5994 7 7367 Kellarvik Bag Kellarvik Bag made from a raven s skin Nick Andrew said They say ravens circle when they see a moose in the fall since they

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/6birds/6-2.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    assiraqan arnait carangllugnek caliarkameggnek quyurrluteng Unuakumi tua i arnat amlleret ayagnaurtut tua i ernerpak llu tayima tua i atakuan llu tua i tekilluteng nutaan Yuuciinateng tua i carangllugnek keggatait ukut caqumaluteng atmaitnek Iitaat cat kelugkaat taperrnat tamakut tamaa i pitullruit atu urkateng Ilait llu ilututaaqluteng waten tumyarat nunam qaingani arnat aturturatullrit allamiaqan Angutet tumyaraqenrilkait arnat taugaam Tuaten tua i ayuqaqluteng uksuarmi qenuvianun tua i After people returned from fish camps every day in good weather women went out and gathered grass that they would work on later Many women left in the morning and were gone all day They d finally come home in the evening You couldn t tell they were people because their upper bodies were covered with grass they carried They collected iitaat tall cottongrass kelugkaat coarse grass taperrnat coarse seashore grass that they would use Some trails that women used year after year were deep They were trails only used by women and not men That s what women did during fall until freeze up Frank Andrew Kwigillingok Photo James H Barker The Andrew and Wasuli families berry picking Kotlik Nunam yui qalarulluki cali aviukarqetuluteng Tauna iqvallerkarteng llu pisqumaluku maniitesqelluteng llu piaqluteng piyukengameggnek Iqvalrianun llu maligut

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/7gathering/7-1a.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    use to carry a woven bag on the back These help to keep one from hurting her chest when carrying heavy objects I C Russell 1902 Department of Anthropology Smithsonian Institution 217807 AFR Annie Blue holding a yoke to her chest at the Ethnologisches Museum Berlin 1997 Ciklaq Root Pick Ciklaq Root pick Catherine Moore said We used these on frozen ground in spring and fall People still use them on the Yukon to dig for delicious roots and tubers J A Jacobsen 1882 Ethnologisches Museum Berlin IVA4183 Qaltaq Bentwood Berry Bucket Qaltaq Bentwood berry bucket painted with uiteraq red ocher a valued pigment with its own awareness Annie Blue noted that if someone came in while a person was using red ocher the painter must cover his work as uiteraq was shy and would not want to be observed 1890s Sheldon Jackson Museum IIS97 Ayatullruunga kiagmi Qaltacuarangqerraqlua kayanguyagarcuutekamnek Umyuartequurlua ll Tua i qaa waniwa kayangurrarmek unangengaitua Tua i taugken ernerpak piiyualua Uqsuqaq aipaagni pekvallagaqan ullagluku tekitaqamku quyalua Tua i ll kayangullua Tangrriu Cikiuteka waniwa During summer I used to travel out to the wilderness I had a small bucket with me to hold small eggs This is what was

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/7gathering/7-1.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    ones for sewing grass baskets Those who don t gather are in need and don t have grass Wangkuta tukuutekaqaput gguq caranglluut Wangkuta maa i teguyaraput Yup igni Tukuutekluki They say these grasses are our riches We Yup ik people constantly used them for something They are our wealth Theresa Moses Toksook Bay James H Barker Clara Akagtak stores dried herring in an issrallugpak large grass storage bag she made quickly from nearby grasses Umkumiut fish camp 1976 Can get Grasses had different uses Taperrnat Coarse seashore grass harvested after fall freeze up and in the spring was twined into mats and baskets Kelugkaat Coarse grass was picked in late summer and made into tomcod storage bags and grass socks Iitaat Tall cottongrass gathered in abundance from the edges of tundra ponds was ideal for lining boots and mittens Talun Comb Comb from Sabotnisky for preparing grass decorated with hair Peter John said that they always combed coarse grass before braiding it E W Nelson 1878 Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Harvard University 50137 Qungasvik Twined Basket Twined basket from Nushagak Annie Blue remarked When I was little I was surrounded by twiners 1890s Sheldon Jackson Museum IIA14 Yupiit

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/7gathering/7-2.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    struggling Our arms will not shorten our legs will not shorten When we are done assisting them we may return to what we were doing and pick up the load and continue on Sophie Nicholas Kasigluk Qessam angtua He gets consent from sloth Piyugngaurluta ellimerciuqumta nangteqenrilkumta egmian niitesqelluta Qessaluni gguq uitavakalria qessam angtua kemga llu piniarulluni unaqiarulluni Qessam gguq tua i tauna angerluku Uitang ermi tua i canrilngermi qessaluni qessaurangluni Makut maa i wangkutnun alingcetaarutkellrit We were told to always get up and do what we were asked to do right away if we weren t sick They say if a person sat idle for too long that person gets approval from sloth His body would become weak and flimsy He would feel listless even though he was fine and he would begin to feel lethargic all the time These were some of the things they told us to get our attention Theresa Moses Toksook Bay Maani gguq nunam qaingani aka arnun nangerngaciqukut They said we would stand on this land for a longer time Tua i taugaam alerquutem qaneryaram elluarrluku pillerkaa akqutkellruarput wangkuta Maani gguq nunam qaingani aka arnun nangengqaqerciquq Maaten tang murilkua ilumuullinilria tua i ilumuupiarluni We were promised a better life if we adhered to the teachings A person was told that he would live a longer life By observing I ve realized that this teaching is true Wassilie Berlin Kasigluk Imutun tuarpiaq waniwa teguviirutqatakacagarluku It seems as though you have caught the Yup ik way of life Tua i ll maa i wiinga quyakeqapqapiarala arqa elpeci waten man a ciuliat caciryarallrat kangiitulangavciu wii tamana quyatekqapqapiararqa cakneq Maa i ciuliaput wangkuta iquggiqaumastaini aug um nangqapigteksailamta Imutun tuarpiaq waniwa teguviirutqatakacagarluku ca igteqatarluku teguq aqsi tuarpiaq yuuyaraat Yupiit apqaungarrluci mat umek nutem ciuliat qaill yuucillratnek Wiinga qunukenritqapiararqa yuuyararput man

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/12today/12-2b.html (2016-05-01)
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  • Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival
    in Credits E W Nelson 1878 Department of Anthropology Smithsonian Institution 48720 Pascirissuun Spruce root clamp Description Dimensions Credits Description Spruce root clamp holding a partially constructed dipper Peter John said Those who bent wood couldn t be without a clamp They would seal it with a little bit of nose blood and even if it opened they could put it back in position and it would stay that way

    Original URL path: http://www.yupikscience.org/2qasgi/2-2a.html (2016-05-01)
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